Markus Schinwald

1

Biennale Venedig, 2011

2

Exhibitionview, Biennale Venedig, 2011

3

Exhibitionview, Biennale Venedig, 2011

4

Orient, HD, 9 min. loop, 2 channel projection, 2011

5

Orient, HD, 9 min. loop, 2 channel projection, 2011

6

Orient, HD, 9 min. loop, 2 channel projection, 2011

7

1st PART CONDITIONAL, 2004
DVD, 35 mm looped, 3 min, ed. 7

8

Albertine, 2009
Wood, white paint, jute, filling, painting (oil on canvas)
205 x 210 x 54 cm, 50 x 38 cm

9

August, 2003
Marionette, motor, clothes
H: 182 cm

10

Contortionists (Vicky), 2003
C-print, ed.3 + 1 A.P.
100 x 100 cm

11

Diarios (to you) #15, 2003
Black and white photograph, ed. 5
25 x 60 cm

12

Dictio pii, 2001/2002
Duratrans mounted on mirror, ed.5
10,62 x 23,62 inches

13

Dictio pii, 2001/2002
Duratrans mounted on mirror, ed.5
10,62 x 23,62 inches

14

Skies, 2009
Oil on canvas
Dimensions variable

15

Isaak, 2003
Iris/Pigmentprint
100 x 70 cm

16

Raymund, 2009
Oil on canvas
97 x 62 cm

17

Untitled (sacks 2), 2009
Wood, jute
120 x 65 x 74 cm

18

Untitled (legs 13), 2009
Wood, leather
115 x 153 x 153 cm

19

Untitled, 2007
Wood, Metall
76 x 100 x 80 cm

20

Solange, 2005
Marionette, swing, clothes

21

A Stage Matrix, 2003
Wood, Mirror, Performance 30 min.
250 x 250 cm

22

ten in love, 2006
Duratrans mounted on mirror, ed. 5
25 x 60 cm

23

ten in love, 2006
Duratrans mounted on mirror, ed. 5
25 x 60 cm

24

Unna, 2008
Oil on canvas
21,65 x 18,11 inch (framed)

Markus Schinwald

The psychological engagement with space and the body, uncanniness and unease, lack as well as the irrational depths of individual and collective being are themes that run through the work of Markus Schinwald (born in 1973). The starting point here is the human body in all its imperfection. In Schinwald’s photographs, sculptures, and film using borrowings from the performative arts, such as theater and dance, they become the projection surface for psychologically-charged interior worlds that permanently seek an outlet for expression and manifest themselves there. With subtle interventions, attributes, and manipulations, like vague apparatuses and prosthetic accessories, the apparently fixed bodies are given a disturbing physical surface. The scenarios that Schinwald develops follow no linear narration with beginning and end, but circulate obsessively and repetitively around a thematic center. These stagings, on first glance minimal and cold, condense to form a complex web of effects that allow for several possibilities and stories that feed on our collective memory.

Most recently the works of Markus Schinwald have been on view at Kunsthaus Bregenz (2009), Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich (2008), London’s Tate Modern (2007), or Kunsthalle Wien (2007). His works are included in prominent collections such as Tate Modern, Vienna’s Belvedere, MUMOK, ARC Musée d'Art Moderne, or Migros Museum.